Abstract

USE OF MEDICINAL PLANTS AS ALTERNATIVE FOR THE CONTROL OF INTESTINAL PARASITOSIS: ASSESSMENT AND PERSPECTIVES

Lissette H. DEGLA 1,4 , Julienne KUISEU 1 , Pascal Abiodoun OLOUNLADE 1,2,* , Sabbas ATTINDEHOU 2,3 , Mawulé S. HOUNZANGBE-ADOTE 2 , Patrick A. EDORH 4 , and Latifou LAGNIKA 5

1 Zootechnical Research and Livestock System Unit, Laboratory of Animal and Fisheries Sciences, Doctoral School of Agricultural and Water Sciences, National University of Agriculture, 01 BP: 55 Porto-Novo, Benin, 2 Animal Health and Biosecurity Research Unit, Laboratory of Animal and Fisheries Sciences, Doctoral School of Agricultural and Water Sciences, National University of Agriculture, 01 BP: 55 Porto-Novo, Benin, 3 Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology and Animal Health, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou, Benin, 4 Laboratoire de Toxicologie et de Santé Environnementale (LATSE), Université d’Abomey-Calavi (UAC), 01 BP 526 Cotonou, République du Bénin, 5 Laboratory of Biochemistry and Bioactive Natural Substances, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Abomey-Calavi, 04BP 0320, Cotonou, Benin.

*Corresponding Author: abiodouno@yahoo.fr

Intestinal parasitosis is a real health problem for animal husbandry which generates economic losses. In the treatment of helminths, synthetic anthelmintics have long been used. However, cases of parasite resistance to these anthelmintics have been reported worldwide. Solutions have been proposed to solve this problem. Among them is the use of medicinal plants with anthelmintic properties. This work proposes to synthesize the work carried out on the evaluation of anthelmintic properties of medicinal plants used in the treatment of intestinal parasitosis of small ruminants. According to the results of the ethnobotanical surveys reported, several medicinal plants are used by the populations in the treatment of intestinal parasitosis of small ruminants and humans. Evaluations of the anthelmintic properties in vitro and or in vivo of some of them have confirmed their potential to be used as an alternative for the control of intestinal parasitosis. However, these results obtained depend on factors such as the organ of the species used, the type of extract and the application dose. Tannins, flavonoids and essential oils are the secondary metabolites responsible for the anthelmintic activity of these medicinal plants with anthelmintic potential. The efficacy of a plant extract (or powder) also depends on the type of parasite used in the tests. The results of previous studies confirm the use of medicinal plants in the fight against intestinal parasitosis.

Keywords: Anthelmintic; Intestinal parasitosis; Medicinal plants; Resistance.

How to cite this article: 
Degla LH, Kuiseu J, Olounlade PA, Attindehou S, Hounzangbe-Adote MS, Edorh PA and Lagnika L, 2021. Use of medicinal plants as alternative for the control of intestinal parasitosis: Assessment and perspectives. Agrobiological Records. https://doi.org/10.47278/journal.abr/2021.011